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40 CNC machining jobs in Arizona

Explore all open CNC machining jobs in Arizona

e.g. Houston, TX

40 Jobs in Arizona

No logo available
TriMas Corporation
locationTolleson, AZ, USA
PublishedPublished: 6/16/2024
No logo available
TriMas Corporation
locationTolleson, AZ, USA
PublishedPublished: 6/16/2024
No logo available
All Things Metal
locationPhoenix, AZ, USA
PublishedPublished: 6/13/2024
salary21-25 / hour
No logo available
Northstar Aerospace
locationPhoenix, AZ, USA
PublishedPublished: 6/12/2024
No logo available
Stinger Bridge & Iron
locationRed Rock, AZ, USA
PublishedPublished: 6/9/2024
salary26-30 / hour
No logo available
NMG Aerospace
locationTempe, AZ 85282, USA
PublishedPublished: 6/9/2024
No logo available
Phoenix Defense
locationGilbert, AZ 85233, USA
PublishedPublished: 6/6/2024
No logo available
Northstar Aerospace
locationPhoenix, AZ, USA
PublishedPublished: 6/5/2024
No logo available
Northstar Aerospace
locationPhoenix, AZ, USA
PublishedPublished: 6/5/2024
No logo available
U-Haul
locationGlendale, AZ, USA
PublishedPublished: 6/4/2024
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40 CNC machining jobs in Arizona: See who is hiring for CNC machining roles in Arizona on hireCNC! Setup job alerts to be notified of new and exciting opportunities in Arizona.

More about the CNC machining trade in Arizona:

The CNC machining industry in Arizona is a key player in the U.S. economy, and ranks among the top machining states in America. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), Arizona employs 2,620 CNC programmer/operators, putting the state inside the top 3 nationally. "Programmers" have an hourly mean wage of $29.88, and "operators" have an hourly mean wage of $22.21.

Arizona is home to several schools that offer CNC machining-related programs, ranging from certificate and diploma programs to associate's degrees. Here are three notable CNC Machining Schools (in no particular order) in Arizona:

  1. Arizona State University: Arizona State University (ASU) offers a Certificate in Computer Numerical Control Machining Technology, which is designed to provide individuals with the fundamental skills and knowledge needed for CNC machining operations. The program provides hands-on instruction from experienced instructors in the classroom and lab settings, offering students the opportunity to learn the basics of CNC machining such as setup,operation, and programming. The program also focuses on safety, materials selection and identification, shop mathematics, part inspection and quality control.
  2. Pima Community College: Pima Community College (PCC) offers an Associate in Applied Science degree in Computer Numerical Control Machining Technology. This program helps students gain the skills needed to become proficient CNC machinists. The curriculum covers topics such as machine shop theory and practice, industrial math, automatic control systems and operations, CNC software programming, CAD/CAM principles and applications, quality assurance techniques, and blueprint reading.
  3. Eastern Arizona College: Located in Thatcher, Eastern Arizona College (EAC) offers both a Certificate of Completion in CNC Setup and Programming and an Associate of Applied Science degree in Machine Tool Technology. The machine tool technology program covers topics such as machining principles, Computer Aided Drafting/Design (CAD/CAM), CNC programming and operation, fluid power systems, and welding technology. The CNC setup and programming certificate is designed to provide students with the basic knowledge and skills needed to operate and program modern CNC machining centers. Students learn about safety practices, manual programming techniques, part set-up/fixturing techniques, as well as control operation methods for current CNC machines.

Major employers of CNC machinists in Arizona include Align Precision, Fathom, NMG Aerospace and Materion Corporation.

Overall, the manufacturing industry is an important contributor to the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of Arizona. In 2018, manufacturing accounted for 11.6 percent of Arizona's total GDP, bringing in over $50 billion in revenue. The state has a diverse range of industries within the sector, including aerospace and defense; semiconductors; mining and mineral products; electronics and electrical equipment; printing and publishing; machinery fabrication; medical devices, supplies, and equipment; food processing; and automotive parts.

The aerospace and defense sector is a major contributor to the state's manufacturing industry. Arizona is home to several large aircraft manufacturers such as Boeing and Lockheed Martin, as well as hundreds of smaller suppliers providing components and services. The semiconductor industry is also a major player in the state's economy, with manufacturers such as Intel, Freescale Semiconductor, and ON Semiconductor leading the way.

The manufacturing sector has had a large impact on Arizona's economy. In 2018, the industry employed over 224,737 people throughout the state. This number has steadily increased over the years, with job growth in manufacturing outpacing that of other sectors. Arizona's manufacturers are also investing heavily in research and development, driving innovation and creating new products that can be sold around the world.